Councillors approve Harvest Hills Golf Course rezoning needed for housing development

COMMUNITIES FIRST
COMMUNITIES FIRST

Despite growing opposition, a Calgary homebuilder’s plans to redevelop the shuttered Harvest Hills golf course have cleared a major hurdle.

Source: Councillors approve Harvest Hills Golf Course rezoning needed for housing development

This land was not needed for housing.  It was rezoned because the developer lobbied Council for a higher return on his investment.

This is another example of Council ignoring the wishes of the community, which loudly demonstrated it wanted the green space protected.

Responsibility not ours: Domtar

“Having never actually operated at the site, we don’t feel like we have any responsibility”  (successor of wood-preserving plant, Canada Creosote Company Ltd)

http://www.pressreader.com/canada/metro-canada-calgary/20160712/textview

figure_holding_up_rock_400_clr_14564 (1)If this is a successful way to dodge liability, then watch out for the liability of tens of thousands of abandoned well sites in Alberta, not to mention the environmental calamity at the oil sands.

Nenshi says revitalization levy for CalgaryNEXT project won’t work

Early analysis suggests using a $200-million community revitalization levy to partially bankroll the Calgary Flames group’s mega sports complex in west downtown won’t work, Mayor Naheed Nenshi said in a recent year-end interview.  This summer, Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corp. pitched an ambitious plan to build a new NHL arena, CFL stadium and public field…

Source: Nenshi says revitalization levy for CalgaryNEXT project won’t work

West Village creosote: What is it and who’s to blame?

One of the biggest hurdles to be cleared before Calgary Sport and Entertainment Corporation’s proposal for an $890-million arena, event centre and fieldhouse can move forward will be the environmental remediation of the West Village.

Source: West Village creosote: What is it and who’s to blame?

Creosote bill new ground for government

When it comes to the environmental cleanup of the proposed CalgaryNEXT’s West Village site, there’s no precedent for the province stepping in to cover the cost, said the premier.

“We have operated in this province for many years on a principle of polluter pay and there’s really no precedent of the province stepping in to pay the cost of remediation when a polluter has contaminated a piece of property,” Premier Rachel Notley said during a visit to the Calgary-Foothills riding Wednesday evening.

Continue reading “Creosote bill new ground for government”

Nenshi says polluter should help pay for creosote clean-up of proposed arena site

The provincial and federal governments bear some responsibility in remediating contaminated land in the city’s West Village where the owners of the Calgary Flames and Stampeders hope to build an $890-million sports complex, says Mayor Naheed Nenshi.

Source: Nenshi says polluter should pay for creosote cleanup in West Village

First, soil remediation at the proposed arena site has been underway for years, begging the question of who is paying for that.  Whoever that is, by paying the cost, has accepted liability and is responsible for completing the clean-up.

Second, the polluter should pay, not just “help pay”.

Community Revitalization Levy 

Alberta[edit] In April 2012, it was proposed that the Alberta government change regulations so that the Community Revitalization Levy (CRL) could be applied to remediation costs “incurred by a private developer.”[36]:18 “The CRL does not currently allow the levy to be used for remediation costs incurred by a private developer. While the CRL is quite a comprehensive approach that is not widely used, it is suggested that a change in regulation to allow the levy to apply to remediation costs would provide inc

Source: Tax increment financing – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is another term for the Community Revitalization Levy tax being sought by Calgary sports and Entertainment  for its proposed arena.

Ken King, president and CEO of Calgary Sport and Entertainment Corp. says West Village creosote cleanup is “No . 1 emerging issue” facing CalgaryNEXT

Flames brass are hopeful government will step in to champion the cleanup of polluted land tapped for a proposed $890-million sports complex.

Source: Ken King, president and CEO of Calgary Sport and Entertainment Corp. says West Village creosote cleanup is “No . 1 emerging issue” facing CalgaryNEXT

‘ Polluter pays’ could apply to arena site

Environmental lawyer says previous owners responsible for remediation

An artist’s rendition shows the proposed $ 890- million stadium project put forward by the Calgary Flames. Documents identify Montreal- based paper producer Domtar, operating as Canada Creosote, as the company responsible for contaminating the proposed site in the 1960s. An environmental lawyer says the previous owners could be forced to clean up the site but Flames CEO Ken King says he isn’t considering taking such action.

Continue reading “‘ Polluter pays’ could apply to arena site”

Studies find tainted water entering river, but harm to fish “unlikely”

Contaminated groundwater is likely flowing around, over and even under a $12.5-million containment wall the Alberta government built nearly two decades ago to keep toxic creosote beneath a former wood preserving plant west of Calgary’s downtown from oozing into the Bow River. While levels of naphthalene in the waterway have spiked in recent years and exceeded guidelines…

Source: Studies find tainted water entering river, but harm to fish “unlikely”

City bought proposed arena lands despite warnings about cleanup costs

Calgary’s city council secretly approved the $36.9-million purchase of contaminated land — now being pitched as part of the site for a new downtown arena and stadium complex — despite expert reports that warned the extent of the pollution and potential cleanup costs needed further investigation.

Source: City bought proposed arena lands despite warnings about cleanup costs

Remediation guesstimates for the soil contaminated at the GSL site range from $200 to $300 million, compared to $36.9 million to buy the site.

There’s nothing polite to say about this purchase.  I think it was bought with the idea that in the near future it could be used as a contribution for the proposed new Flames arena.  That way, Council could say that no public funds were being used for a private sports organization.

Also, the word “secretly” is bothersome.  Public business (buying the land) should be done in public!

Contaminated sites law could force Domtar to clean up creosote, experts say

A former government official says Alberta’s contaminated sites legislation was drafted over two decades ago with an eye to making Domtar Corp. clean up the mess at a former wood preserving plant in Calgary where experts have estimated close to two million litres of toxic creosote and pentachlorophenol leaked beneath the surface. But in the…

Source: Contaminated sites law could force Domtar to clean up creosote, experts say