Canada Cracks

Tom SindlingerBritish Columbia puts the cracks in Canada.  By extorting a toll on Alberta oil shipped across provincial borders, B.C. has dumped the Canadian Constitution.

The Canadian Constitution clearly gives absolute power over inter-provincial trade (Section 92[10][a]) to the federal government ― not B.C..

From a more fundamental point of view, the common interest binding people into countries is economics.  We share (trade) among each other for the common good.

B.C.’s precedent setting action means Alberta can toll (tax) every rail car to and from B.C.; every truck to and from B.C.; every air plane to and from B.C..

Where does it stop?

Seattle Council rejects multi-purpose arena

Seattle Councilors voting against a new arena said “that financial arguments had swayed them. They said that giving over city resources for the project ….  made the arena terms questionable” [N.Y. Times, May 7, 2016]

“Reasonable people may disagree with their vote, but these council members were fulfilling their fiduciary responsibility to Seattle residents and acting in good faith”.  [Seattle Times, Letters to the Editor, May 5, 2016]

Flames’ CalgaryNEXT arena plan sent back to drawing board by council

City officials will huddle with Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corp., the company that owns the Flames and Stampeders, to find the best fit for the CalgaryNEXT arena-stadium proposal. A week after city bureaucrats determined the ambitious project would cost in the range of $1.8 billion — significantly more than the initial pitch of $890 million — and declared…

Source: Flames’ CalgaryNEXT arena plan sent back to drawing board by council

Flames put positive media spin on  administration’s rejection of proposed arena.  Says admin’s rejection is opportunity for new talks on a new arena.

Kelly McParland: Calgary’s dream arena lands with a thunk in the middle of meltdown

Just as Alberta is trying to keep the roof from falling in, along comes CalgaryNEXT with a plan for a $1.8 billion sports development, largely at public expense

Source: Kelly McParland: Calgary’s dream arena lands with a thunk in the middle of meltdown

This article says look out, the proposed CalgaryNEXT was just for openers.  The arena advocates will be back with a modified proposal that they will tout as being just what we asked for.  But, tax payers will still be expected to pay for it.

‘There’s lots of potential that remains,’ King says of CalgaryNext as councillors look for alternatives

A major report deeming the CalgaryNext proposal “not feasible” has some city councillors looking for other ideas to replace the Saddledome and McMahon Stadium, but Ken King isn’t willing to give up on the idea just yet.

Source: ‘There’s lots of potential that remains,’ King says of CalgaryNext as councillors look for alternatives

Mr. King needs more than a new arena to save his job.  He needs a Stanley Cup.

Wildrose suggests province should stay on fringe of CalgaryNext proposal | News Talk 770 (CHQR)

Source: Wildrose suggests province should stay on fringe of CalgaryNext proposal | News Talk 770 (CHQR)

Opposed, maybe?  This is a bit of prevaricating by wild Rose.  Com’ on guys, you’re either for it or against it!

Sport Calgary watching CalgaryNEXT from the sidelines, for now – 660 NEWS

The debate over the massive CalgaryNEXT arena, football stadium, fieldhouse project, really heated up this week when the NHL commissioner was in town. So what does Sport Calgary think? Murray Sigler is with the umbrella organization for several amateur sport groups in the city. He was on Sportsnet 960 The Fan with Rob Kerr. Sigler […]

Source: Sport Calgary watching CalgaryNEXT from the sidelines, for now – 660 NEWS

The expert urban planners and city recreation department have been planning file houses for Foothills and North Glenmore for years.  They have the demographic data and the city vision that the flames do not.  the Flames should stick to hockey and try to win a Stanley cup

Ewart: As Harper was to Keystone XL, Bettman is to CalgaryNEXT

What Stephen Harper was to the Keystone XL pipeline debate, Gary Bettman is to the Calgary Flames’ proposal for a new arena and football stadium complex for the city. As an advocate for the high-profile infrastructure project, Bettman is a minor character in a complex process who has a lot to say but only a marginal influence on the eventual decision. The National Hockey League’s…

Source: Ewart: As Harper was to Keystone XL, Bettman is to CalgaryNEXT

“the core message [from Bettman] is directly from Murray Edwards, Al Markin, Clay Riddell and the other partners in Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corp., which owns the Flames and Stamps.”

Guiding principles for downtown Flames arena development

Project Guidelines
Set by Council *
What Has Happened
So Far
1.      Public money must be used for public benefit This is wiggle room for Councillors to say an NHL franchise is good for City pride.  It should say that Public money must not be used for a Flames hockey arena.
2.      There must be extensive stakeholder consultation, public engagement and open and transparent communications with Calgarians Calgary’s city council secretly approved the $36.9-million purchase of contaminated land — now being pitched as part of the site for a new downtown arena and stadium complex … [MATT MCCLURE, CALGARY HERALD, August 18, 2015]
3.      West Village must be designed and developed as a vibrant mixed-use neighborhood City of Calgary urban planners know more about this than a hockey club pitching for a free arena.
4.      Any new fieldhouse must meet the needs of key stake-holders ― including but not limited to the University of Calgary, amateur sports groups and the general public City Recreation, after lengthy demographic study, concluded that a fieldhouse should be at Foothills and another at Glenmore, not downtown.
5.      Any new arena-stadium/event facility located within of near Calgary’s city centre must complement the existing amenities of the city centre, and contribute to its long-term vibrancy and appeal. Would you like a hockey arena in your neighborhood?  I don’t think so.
6.      The cost of remediating contamination of the West Village site should be the responsibility of the polluter(s) to the extent that such recovery is legally possible. Why hasn’t it already been cleaned: is it physically possible?
*Helen Pike, Calgary metroNEWS, November 12, 2015

Should Calgary’s new arena and stadium project go to a plebiscite? – Calgary – CBC News

When it comes to a new sports complex, and whether it’s in “the public benefit,” the question could be put to a plebiscite. But Mayor Naheed Nenshi doesn’t want to go there, so CBC’s Rob Brown takes a look at our options.

Source: Should Calgary’s new arena and stadium project go to a plebiscite? – Calgary – CBC News

A public vote should be binding, whether it is a plebiscite or a referendum.  The question should be “Would you pay more than $2,000 each for a professional hockey arena?” and not “Would you like a new hockey arena?”

A tale of two cities: Comparison between Edmonton’s Rogers Place and proposed Calgary arena development

As Edmonton’s downtown arena takes shape following years of wrangling, Calgary is looking to create a new home for its own sports teams.

Source: A tale of two cities: Comparison between Edmonton’s Rogers Place and proposed Calgary arena development

CalgaryNEXT sure to be an election issue

voting_line_ballot_box_1600_clr_9468In announcing plans for the CalgaryNEXT project, the Flames organization has likely also launched a $250 million election issue in the 2017 civic campaign.

Source: CalgaryNEXT sure to be an election issue

Evan Woolley and Gian-Carlo Carra saying they are at least open to having the conversation, and others, like Coun. Druh Farrell saying she is dead set against it.

Economist on CalgaryNEXT: $1 in could mean $1.20 out – 660 NEWS

A high-ranking official for a Canadian economic think tank is laying out how CalgaryNEXT could be approved with the contribution of taxpayer money. Glen Hodgson, Senior VP and Chief Economist with the Conference Board of Canada, said while research suggests new sports facilities don’t create a net benefit to a local economy, they could be […]

Source: Economist on CalgaryNEXT: $1 in could mean $1.20 out – 660 NEWS

Meetings and consultations for arena plan

NEXT STEPS

Consulting Calgarians on new arena plan:

business_conference_400_clr_3835Where do we go from here?

 

After announcing plans to build an $890 million arena, event centre and fieldhouse, the next step for Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corp. officials will be to begin meeting with various levels of government, said president and CEO Ken King, while city officials will start engaging Calgarians and looking into the cleanup of the creosote-contaminated site.

“Essentially this is the

Formal request,” said King. “What we want to do now is begin the dialogue on a (Community Revitalization Levy), that’s a dialogue that takes place between the (Calgary Municipal Land Corp., which manages cityowned lands) the city and the province.”

Continue reading “Meetings and consultations for arena plan”

Flames to meet with stakeholders to discusses viability of CalgaryNEXT proposal | Calgary Herald

Calgary Flames executives will join a meeting next week with stakeholders in tourism, civic affairs and amateur sport to discuss the viability of the CalgaryNEXT proposal. In a meeting with the Herald’s editorial team Thursday, Ken King, CEO of the Calgary Sports and Entertainment Corp., confirmed he will meet next week with city officials, Tourism…

Source: Flames to meet with stakeholders to discusses viability of CalgaryNEXT proposal | Calgary Herald

Councilor at odds with water expert

A Calgary city councillor who represents the inner city is taking issue with a water expert who suggested no new development should take place along the Bow River in downtown Calgary.

His comments come a day after a renowned hydrologist questioned the wisdom of building a new hockey arena, covered football stadium and multi- sport field house in a floodplain.

Continue reading “Councilor at odds with water expert”