‘ Polluter pays’ could apply to arena site

Environmental lawyer says previous owners responsible for remediation

An artist’s rendition shows the proposed $ 890- million stadium project put forward by the Calgary Flames. Documents identify Montreal- based paper producer Domtar, operating as Canada Creosote, as the company responsible for contaminating the proposed site in the 1960s. An environmental lawyer says the previous owners could be forced to clean up the site but Flames CEO Ken King says he isn’t considering taking such action.

Continue reading “‘ Polluter pays’ could apply to arena site”

CalgaryNEXT sets high stakes in a battle for Calgary’s future

A new Mainstreet Research poll shows we’re in for a long, wrenching debate over the west end and the very soul of the city. Thirty-nine per cent of Calgarians like, or somewhat like, the CalgaryNEXT plan for building a vast multi-sport complex. Thirty-four per cent are opposed or somewhat opposed. The rest are somewhere in the…

Source: Braid: CalgaryNEXT sets high stakes in a battle for Calgary’s future

Studies find tainted water entering river, but harm to fish “unlikely”

Contaminated groundwater is likely flowing around, over and even under a $12.5-million containment wall the Alberta government built nearly two decades ago to keep toxic creosote beneath a former wood preserving plant west of Calgary’s downtown from oozing into the Bow River. While levels of naphthalene in the waterway have spiked in recent years and exceeded guidelines…

Source: Studies find tainted water entering river, but harm to fish “unlikely”

City bought proposed arena lands despite warnings about cleanup costs

Calgary’s city council secretly approved the $36.9-million purchase of contaminated land — now being pitched as part of the site for a new downtown arena and stadium complex — despite expert reports that warned the extent of the pollution and potential cleanup costs needed further investigation.

Source: City bought proposed arena lands despite warnings about cleanup costs

Remediation guesstimates for the soil contaminated at the GSL site range from $200 to $300 million, compared to $36.9 million to buy the site.

There’s nothing polite to say about this purchase.  I think it was bought with the idea that in the near future it could be used as a contribution for the proposed new Flames arena.  That way, Council could say that no public funds were being used for a private sports organization.

Also, the word “secretly” is bothersome.  Public business (buying the land) should be done in public!

GSL land deal fuels speculation of new arena, condo towers

The City of Calgary now officially owns the GSL land on the western outskirts of downtown leading to speculation on what it plans to do with its real estate holdings of more than 12 hectares in the area along Bow Trail.

Source: GSL land deal fuels speculation of new arena, condo towers

Was this land bought so the City could mask a contribution to the proposed Flames arena?

Councillors know there will be much opposition to contributing public money to a private sports organization.  Buying the land means they can say  “no money, but wait, we have this land you can use“.

Clever but misleading.

Contaminated sites law could force Domtar to clean up creosote, experts say

A former government official says Alberta’s contaminated sites legislation was drafted over two decades ago with an eye to making Domtar Corp. clean up the mess at a former wood preserving plant in Calgary where experts have estimated close to two million litres of toxic creosote and pentachlorophenol leaked beneath the surface. But in the…

Source: Contaminated sites law could force Domtar to clean up creosote, experts say

Councillors divided on funding plan for new Flames arena

Just as Calgarians are divided on the merits and financing of a mega multi-sport complex proposed to replace the aging Saddledome and McMahon Stadium, so too is Calgary city council. After the owners of the Flames and Stampeders unveiled their long-awaited plans last week to construct an $890-million complex dubbed CalgaryNEXT, an exclusive poll for…

Source: Councillors divided on funding plan for new Flames arena

Braid: A visionary arena project, wrapped in mystery

The Calgary Flames’ arena proposal for the west end is brilliant. It’s also a dream wrapped in a mystery shrouded in fog. At this stage, the Flames can answer virtually no questions about the biggest building and revitalization project ever proposed for Calgary. With the hockey rink, event centre, football stadium and fieldhouse all in one…

Source: Braid: A visionary arena project, wrapped in mystery

Plan splits city: poll

Calgarians narrowly support West Village sports complex but oppose financing scheme

Most Calgarians would like a new sports complex, and many even support the CalgaryNEXT proposal unveiled by the owners of the Flames and Stampeders this week, but there’s strong opposition to spending public money on the $890-million project, according to an exclusive poll for the Herald.

A Mainstreet Research survey shows 39 per cent support the proposal to replace the Scotiabank Saddledome and McMahon Stadium, while 34 per cent oppose the plan.

However, nearly half are against the proposed financing model, which sees Continue reading “Plan splits city: poll”

Local amateur sports community intrigued by CalgaryNEXT’s field house vision | Calgary Herald

Many members of Calgary’s amateur sports community, especially those in need of facilities, are in favour of CalgaryNEXT’s vision of a multi-sport field house stadium. But there are also plenty of questions surrounding the proposal. The presentation revealed by Calgary Sports and Entertainment Group last week included a state of the art field house with…

Source: Local amateur sports community intrigued by CalgaryNEXT’s field house vision | Calgary Herald

Canadian Taxpayers Federation no-public-funds petition

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) has renewed its petition opposing tax dollars for pro sports arenas, reflecting the Calgary Flames ownership’s recent request for public funds to build CalgaryNEXT.

Last week, Calgary Flames president Ken King unveiled an $890-million plan for a new arena, stadium and fieldhouse that would require a large buy-in from the city.

Calgary Flames ownership is expecting a possible $690 million — or more — from public funds to either front the money or pay a portion of the new sports complex, the CTF said in a press release.

Pro sports complexes should be paid for with tickets, not taxes,” said CTF-Alberta Director Paige MacPherson, in a prepared release.

Continue reading “Canadian Taxpayers Federation no-public-funds petition”

New poll finds Calgarians are torn on CalgaryNext plan for multi-sport complex

The poll suggests that Calgarians are split on whether to support a proposed plan for a $1 billion sports complex for the Flames and Stampeders and whether public money should be used to build it.

Source: New poll finds Calgarians are torn on CalgaryNext plan for multi-sport complex

Calgary Flames’ proposed arena could be another example of why public funding doesn’t equal public benefit

Scott Stinson: That’s the problem with arenas, in sum: they attract money, but only money that would have been spent locally anyway

Source: Calgary Flames’ proposed arena could be another example of why public funding doesn’t equal public benefit

The losing game of publicly financed sports venues

Spending billions for new arenas is touted by politicians and team owners as a sure win for the economy – but a plethora of studies shows otherwise

Source: The losing game of publicly financed sports venues

“One of the oldest con games – the notion that spending public money on pro sports venues is a sound investment.”

The Flames are asking every Calgarian for an initial $200 contribution for a new arena.

Sugar coating the request is a promise they will designate a small portion of the arena for amateur sports, so the the Foothills recreation site will not be needed (get it, the money for the Foothills site could then be spent on the Flames’ site).

Sorry, there are no polls available at the moment.I SAY NO, but this is a controversial matter.  So, let’s have a plebiscite.  The public has a right to be heard.

No Councilor campaigned or was elected to commit us to such an enormous expense.